Men Need to Visit the Dentist More, Survey Finds

by MikeMeehan 6/14/2017 9:42 AM

Statistics show men need to visit the dentist more. There are some strong indicators that show we need to encourage our fathers, sons, brothers, husbands, and friends to take better care of their oral health. Recent noteworthy stats June is Men’s Health Month, and oral health is an important part of overall health. According to the 2017 Delta Dental Adult Oral Health and Well-Being Survey, men need to focus more on their oral health. Here are some of statistics from the recent survey: Only 63% of men visit the dentist at least once a year Only 69% of men brush their teeth the recommended twice a day 59% of men skip a brushing session at least once a month In the same survey, 69% of respondents noted that a smile is most important for a first impression whether at work, on a date, or other circumstances. It seems we all value a bright smile, and it’s a good reason to keep your oral health a priority. Periodontal disease, a specific concern Other studies have shown that men are more likely than women to develop periodontal (gum) disease. For example, 56.4% of men develop gum disease compared to 38.4% of women. Periodontal disease has been linked to cardiovascular disease and other health factors, so this is another alert to men. Watch for signs of gum disease such as swollen, red, tender or bleeding gums. There is another specific concern for men if they’re taking heart or blood pressure medication. These medications can cause a condition called dry mouth. With a lack of saliva, the risk of cavities increases. Some recommendations to combat dry mouth are increasing water intake, and avoiding salty foods, alcohol, caffeine and carbonated drinks. Some standard tips for oral health The choices and habits of some men can put them at a greater risk of oral health problems. Here are some standard dental health tips as a reminder, not just for men, for everyone: Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day – It’s essential to prevent gum disease, tooth decay and bad breath. Visit the dentist – During your visit, get screened for gum disease and oral cancer. Choose healthier foods – Choosing fruits and veggies instead of pretzels and chips will not only help your overall health, it will prevent cavities from those foods that are high in carbs and sugar. Don’t use your teeth as a tool – This is often the reason behind dental injuries. Use your hand and arm strength to open those bottles and bags. No more tobacco – Smoking and chewing tobacco can cause oral cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, oral cancers are more than twice as common in men as in women. Gum disease, lost teeth, stained teeth and bad breath are some other possible impacts of using tobacco and tobacco products. Use these examples when you encourage a person (like your dad) to quit. On Father’s Day this Sunday, check in with your dad and make sure he is visiting the dentist. A new electronic toothbrush with a supply of dental floss would be a useful and considerate gift. Most importantly, tell him you care about him. That alone could be enough motivation for him to visit the dentist and pay more attention to his oral health.

Improve Your Brushing Technique

by MikeMeehan 5/1/2017 2:30 PM

When it comes to dental hygiene, brushing and flossing are some of the most important routines for your smile, yet they could possibly use a little improvement. Why You Need to Brush Twice a Day Brushing and flossing can remove plaque, tartar and stains. These three culprits can cause problems of all sorts: • Cavities • Gum disease, like gingivitis or periodontitis • Weakened tooth enamel, making teeth more susceptible to chips or cracks Conditions like these can wreak havoc on your smile. But the issues don’t stop there. Bad oral health doesn’t just put you at risk for cavities, gum disease, and weakened tooth enamel; it can increase risks for serious conditions like diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Follow these steps to ensure that you are brushing properly. Six Steps for Better Brushing 1. Place your toothbrush bristles at a 45-degree angle to the gumline 2. Use just enough pressure to feel bristles against your gums and between teeth. Don’t squish the bristles 3. Brush all inner and outer tooth surfaces several times, using short, circular strokes. Be sure to brush along the gumline as well 4. Brush chewing surfaces straight on. Clean the inside surfaces of front teeth by tilting the brush vertically and making up-and-down strokes with the front of the brush 5. Clean only one or two teeth at a time 6. Brush your tongue, as oral bacteria can remain in taste buds By following these brushing techniques, you will keep your smile healthy and help improve your overall health

How My Power Walk Turned into a Power Smile

by MikeMeehan 4/5/2017 4:00 PM

I was fortunate enough to get out for a hike, recently. And the whole time, I couldn’t stop smiling. Despite the burning muscles in my legs, the rustling trees, the blooming yellow flowers and the invigorating air, lifted my spirits and encouraged me to keep going. Power walking turned into a power smile. The connection between a walk and a smile Here at Delta Dental, we emphasize the link between oral health and overall health. So, we are happy to celebrate National Walking Day, this week, and bring attention to this connection. An unhealthy mouth can increase the risk of health problems. But a healthy mouth can keep you healthy and keep you walking. The Message of National Walking Day The American Heart Association sponsors National Walking Day on Wednesday, April 5, to remind us of the health benefits of walking. Research shows that walking at least 30 minutes a day has many benefits like reducing your risk of heart disease and improving your mental well-being. Whether you are walking, hiking, biking, or partaking in any exercise, your oral health can be a part of your overall healthy lifestyle choices. What to bring on your walk or hike Remember to pack a water bottle (hydration is good for the mouth), a smile-friendly apple for a snack, and sunglasses to protect your eyes. One good decision leads to another I can’t take credit for having the willpower to get out there for a power walk; it was an invitation from a friend that encouraged me. But the decision to go, led to another decision to eat salad this week for lunch, and another decision to plan to hike again in a few weeks. It led me to find more hiking and walking trails near me. It gave me energy to make other healthy choices. And those healthy lifestyle choices include good oral health habits. We say “Good health starts here.” So good health starts with a healthy smile and one foot in front of the other.  

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