UV Safety Month Tips for Your Oral Health

by MikeMeehan 7/19/2017 10:10 AM

Our awareness of the hazards of UV rays might not include the hazards to our oral health. So, let’s fill in the gap and make sure your smiles are protected from outside oral health dangers. Our focus on this topic also coincides with UV Safety Month, aptly designated as July, when summer pool parties and outdoor activities are at their peak. You may be skipping this important step In the summer, with our trips to the pool and beach, and all the time we spend outside, we remember to protect our skin from the sun’s harmful rays with sunscreen and hats. Now include your lips when you think about protection from the sun. According to Everyday Health, Inc., 63% of people who use sunscreen don’t protect their lips. Sun exposure can increase your risk for lip cancer. Because the skin on your lips is delicate, it requires UV protection just like the rest of your body. When you stock up on sunscreen for the summer, include SPF 30 lip balm or lip sunscreen. Remember to look for an SPF that covers both UVA and UVB rays and just like sunscreen you use on your skin, reapply often. Now with your lips protected while sitting by the pool, there are two other oral health dangers we’d like you to watch out for. Too much chlorine could hurt your enamel The chlorine in the pool is protecting us from bacteria, but pools with too much chlorine can cause damage to the enamel on your teeth. The pH levels can erode tooth enamel, the hard shell coating that protects from decay. Most pools are regularly checked and monitored for pH levels, but it’s a good idea to remind your kids to keep their mouths closed while swimming. Lifeguard says, “No running!” When the lifeguard blows the whistle and yells at the kids, that lifeguard may very well be saving some teeth! With the slippery surfaces that surround a pool, a slip and fall could result in a chipped tooth. Playing in the water can also lead to hitting into pool walls or floors, and playing with friends can turn into an accidental elbow to the mouth. Encouraging all to follow the pool rules can prevent a dental injury, so remember–no running, no diving in the shallow end and no horsing around. Happy summer We want you and your kids to keep those summer smiles intact. Grab the sunscreen products and your sunglasses, and enjoy the sun and outdoors. And just like we encourage preventive dental care all year, remember to keep it up during the summer.

Men Need to Visit the Dentist More, Survey Finds

by MikeMeehan 6/14/2017 9:42 AM

Statistics show men need to visit the dentist more. There are some strong indicators that show we need to encourage our fathers, sons, brothers, husbands, and friends to take better care of their oral health. Recent noteworthy stats June is Men’s Health Month, and oral health is an important part of overall health. According to the 2017 Delta Dental Adult Oral Health and Well-Being Survey, men need to focus more on their oral health. Here are some of statistics from the recent survey: Only 63% of men visit the dentist at least once a year Only 69% of men brush their teeth the recommended twice a day 59% of men skip a brushing session at least once a month In the same survey, 69% of respondents noted that a smile is most important for a first impression whether at work, on a date, or other circumstances. It seems we all value a bright smile, and it’s a good reason to keep your oral health a priority. Periodontal disease, a specific concern Other studies have shown that men are more likely than women to develop periodontal (gum) disease. For example, 56.4% of men develop gum disease compared to 38.4% of women. Periodontal disease has been linked to cardiovascular disease and other health factors, so this is another alert to men. Watch for signs of gum disease such as swollen, red, tender or bleeding gums. There is another specific concern for men if they’re taking heart or blood pressure medication. These medications can cause a condition called dry mouth. With a lack of saliva, the risk of cavities increases. Some recommendations to combat dry mouth are increasing water intake, and avoiding salty foods, alcohol, caffeine and carbonated drinks. Some standard tips for oral health The choices and habits of some men can put them at a greater risk of oral health problems. Here are some standard dental health tips as a reminder, not just for men, for everyone: Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day – It’s essential to prevent gum disease, tooth decay and bad breath. Visit the dentist – During your visit, get screened for gum disease and oral cancer. Choose healthier foods – Choosing fruits and veggies instead of pretzels and chips will not only help your overall health, it will prevent cavities from those foods that are high in carbs and sugar. Don’t use your teeth as a tool – This is often the reason behind dental injuries. Use your hand and arm strength to open those bottles and bags. No more tobacco – Smoking and chewing tobacco can cause oral cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, oral cancers are more than twice as common in men as in women. Gum disease, lost teeth, stained teeth and bad breath are some other possible impacts of using tobacco and tobacco products. Use these examples when you encourage a person (like your dad) to quit. On Father’s Day this Sunday, check in with your dad and make sure he is visiting the dentist. A new electronic toothbrush with a supply of dental floss would be a useful and considerate gift. Most importantly, tell him you care about him. That alone could be enough motivation for him to visit the dentist and pay more attention to his oral health.

The Crucial Sunscreen Step You're Probably Skipping

by Jason 7/2/2015 7:00 AM

Picture perfect days call for outdoor activities. Time to slap on the sunscreen! Once you grease down, your skin is ready to enjoy one-on-one time with the sun. But you may be forgetting something (Hint: It’s not your back).

Surprisingly, 63% of sunscreen users don’t protect their pout. And the forecast isn’t so sunny for those who skip their lips – sun exposure increases your risk for lip cancer.... more...

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