Understanding the ins and outs of dual coverage

by MikeMeehan 8/8/2018 2:00 PM

It’s not uncommon to be covered by two dental benefits plans, which means that you have “dual coverage.” If this applies to you or your family members, take a moment to learn how dual coverage works with these four key points. 1. Understand your coordination of benefits (COB). Your COB is the way your two plans work together when you have dual coverage. The plan that pays first is called the “primary plan,” while the one that pays second is called the “secondary plan.” When your dental office sends a bill, they will address it to the primary plan provider. After the primary plan provider has paid, the remainder of the bill will be sent to your secondary plan provider. In some cases, the secondary plan may cover the rest of the bill.  2. Figure out which plan pays first.  For kids, the primary plan provider can be determined in a couple of ways: •If you’re currently married and your kids have dual coverage, their primary plan will be based on your and your spouse’s birthdays. The parent whose birthday comes first in the year (regardless of birth year) will have the primary plan. For example, if your birthday is June 15th and your spouse’s birthday is December 1st, yours would be the primary plan.  •When parents are divorced, a child’s primary plan typically comes from the parent with the largest portion of custody. It’s best to check with your benefits provider because this may vary depending on your situation. If you have dual coverage because you’re married, the coverage you receive under your employer is your primary plan, as opposed to the coverage you receive from your spouse. Alternatively, you might have dual coverage because you have two jobs. In this case, the plan you’ve had for the longest will be your primary plan. 3. Don’t expect double coverage.  Dual coverage means your two benefits providers share costs in a pre-determined way – not that you receive double benefits. For example, both plans may cover two cleanings a year, but having dual coverage doesn’t mean that you’re now covered for four. 4. Know if your plan has a non-duplication of benefits clause.  Some plans have a rule that prevents secondary plan coverage when the primary plan already paid as much or more than the secondary plan would have covered if it had been the primary plan. Check your plan information to see if your secondary plan has this rule before using your benefits.  With some quick research, you can handle dual coverage with ease and know what to expect after you visit the dentist.

How dental coverage changes when you get married

by MikeMeehan 6/14/2018 11:09 AM

June can be a great time to schedule a wedding. That means it’s also a good time to learn what can happen to your dental benefits when you get married. When it comes to your dental coverage, marriage is considered a “qualifying life event.” After a qualifying life event, you can make changes to your dental plan within a specified amount of time. If your change isn’t requested in time, you may have to wait for open enrollment – the window of time when you can make changes to your dental coverage. Check your dental coverage to see when the adjustment will take effect.  In the period during which you can make a change, you have a couple options. You can choose to keep your coverage as is, become a dependent under your spouse’s plan or make your spouse a dependent under your plan. If one party does become a dependent, they have the option to keep their current coverage or discontinue it. If you choose to be covered under both plans, you have what is known as “dual coverage.” The plan that covered you originally is the primary plan and the plan that covers you as a dependent is the secondary. The primary plan will pay its portion first and the secondary plan will act as a supplement. Depending on what you choose, you may need to make a coverage update. For coverage obtained through employers, HR departments of both parties will need to make the requested change and update you and your spouse’s personal information. If you don’t receive coverage through an employer, you can reach out directly to your dental plan provider.  In the case that you decide not to switch your dental plan but change your last name, you will still need to contact your HR department or benefits provider to update your information. When updates have been made, you may want to request a new insurance card for your next appointment.  By knowing your options ahead of time, you can take some stress off your plate as you prepare for the big day.  

How dental coverage changes when you get married

by MikeMeehan 6/14/2018 11:09 AM

June can be a great time to schedule a wedding. That means it’s also a good time to learn what can happen to your dental benefits when you get married. When it comes to your dental coverage, marriage is considered a “qualifying life event.” After a qualifying life event, you can make changes to your dental plan within a specified amount of time. If your change isn’t requested in time, you may have to wait for open enrollment – the window of time when you can make changes to your dental coverage. Check your dental coverage to see when the adjustment will take effect.  In the period during which you can make a change, you have a couple options. You can choose to keep your coverage as is, become a dependent under your spouse’s plan or make your spouse a dependent under your plan. If one party does become a dependent, they have the option to keep their current coverage or discontinue it. If you choose to be covered under both plans, you have what is known as “dual coverage.” The plan that covered you originally is the primary plan and the plan that covers you as a dependent is the secondary. The primary plan will pay its portion first and the secondary plan will act as a supplement. Depending on what you choose, you may need to make a coverage update. For coverage obtained through employers, HR departments of both parties will need to make the requested change and update you and your spouse’s personal information. If you don’t receive coverage through an employer, you can reach out directly to your dental plan provider.  In the case that you decide not to switch your dental plan but change your last name, you will still need to contact your HR department or benefits provider to update your information. When updates have been made, you may want to request a new insurance card for your next appointment.  By knowing your options ahead of time, you can take some stress off your plate as you prepare for the big day.  

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