How dental benefits improve employees’ well-being

by MikeMeehan 5/25/2018 11:36 AM

Offering a dental plan to your employees isn’t just about oral health. Dental benefits have been shown to improve both oral health and overall well-being. Dental coverage emphasizes preventive care Americans lose more than 164 million hours of work every year due to dental disease. But dental coverage can go a long way toward helping employees avoid oral health problems that require them to call in sick. Preventive care, like regular dental exams and cleanings, is typically fully covered under most dental plans including many of those available from Delta Dental.  Adults with dental coverage are 73 percent more likely than those without to visit the dentist at least once a year. By visiting the dentist regularly, employees can address dental issues right away – before they become costly, painful problems that lead to time away from the office.  Oral health is linked to overall well-beingPeople who keep annual dental appointments are more likely to report good oral health. Those who rate their oral health as good tend to also give their overall well-being a good or better rating.  When it comes to physical health, regular dental visits can help with early disease detection. According to the book, “Oral Diagnosis, Oral Medicine and Treatment Planning,” signs and symptoms of over 120 diseases appear in the mouth including diabetes and heart disease. Catching these diseases early can mean higher chances of effective treatment and less medical costs down the road. And last, but definitely not least, dentists may screen for oral cancer during routine checkups, which can dramatically aid in early detection and successful treatment.  Oral health is linked to successGood oral health touches multiple areas of our lives like speaking, smiling, eating, expressing emotions and more. Without it, people can feel uncomfortable smiling and expressing themselves fully. They may even experience anxiety about their oral health that can make everyday life more stressful.  By feeling confident in their smile and satisfied with their oral health, employees can focus their attention on what matters most.  

What’s the Difference Between Copay and Coinsurance?

by MikeMeehan 3/21/2018 1:39 PM

Copayment and coinsurance are both ways you help share the costs of dental care with Delta Dental. Most of the time, Delta Dental members have a copay or coinsurance, but not both. Here’s what you need to know: Copayment, also known as a copay, is a set amount you are required to pay your dentist for a service. When you have a copayment, you may not have to worry about a deductible or an annual maximum. A deductible is the set dollar amount you have to pay before your dental plan kicks in for covered services. Deductible amounts vary from plan to plan. An annual maximum is the most a dental plan will pay toward your dental care within a specific period, typically a calendar year. Coinsurance is a fixed percentage of a treatment cost you share with your dental plan. For example, you may be responsible for 20 percent of a given service while Delta Dental covers the other 80 percent. Meaning that if your total bill is $100 for a given service, you’ll pay $20 and Delta Dental will pay $80. However, you must first meet your deductible and you may have an annual maximum for the year. To learn more about your dental plan’s copay or coinsurance, login at deltadental.com or on Delta Dental’s free mobile app. You can also call the customer service number on your Delta Dental ID card.

Your Dental Benefits for the Year Ahead

by MikeMeehan 2/21/2018 12:26 PM

Now that 2018 is well underway, your yearly expense planning may also be in progress. As you’re organizing your finances and other paperwork in preparation of tax season, it’s also a great time to check on the status of your dental benefits. Here are some things to consider. First, check to see if your dental benefits renew at the calendar year or the contract year, which is usually based on when your plan actually took effect. For example, if your benefits started in April, your benefits would typically renew 12 months later, in April. If your benefits renew at the calendar year, the annual slate will typically be wiped clean on your benefits such as: Deductible: Your deductible is the set dollar amount you must pay out-of-pocket before your dental plan begins to pay for covered services, so you’ll need to meet this amount again for 2018. Preventive services, such as exams and cleanings, are typically covered regardless of whether your deductible has been met. Annual maximum: This is the maximum amount your dental plan will pay toward your dental care within a specific period, often a calendar year. Your annual maximum reset if your plan renewed January 1. If you were holding off on treatment because you reached your 2017 annual maximum, you may want to schedule an appointment now. While you’re assessing your dental benefits, you may also want to review where you stand on lifetime maximums. This is the maximum amount of money your plan will pay toward specific services, such as orthodontics and prosthodontics, over the course of a lifetime. Many services have no lifetime maximum. Always check the specifics of your dental plan to understand any applicable maximums or deductibles.  

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