Sugar and Your Teeth

by MikeMeehan 1/15/2018 10:47 AM

When you reach for a cookie or a piece of candy and you place that sugar-filled food in your mouth, you might only think about how wonderful and delicious it tastes. Now I’m going to challenge you to think of it from a different perspective. Here’s what happens to your teeth when that sugar enters your mouth. Bacteria in your mouth There’s good bacteria and bad bacteria in your mouth. The harmful bacteria uses the sugar from the cookie or piece of candy to create acid. Acid hurts your enamel The acid that was just formed from the bacteria and sugar in your mouth will now work to destroy the enamel of your teeth. Enamel is like a protective coating on your teeth. But the acid removes important minerals on your enamel, and eventually causes it to weaken and form a hole in your tooth, also known as a cavity. A cavity forms With the destroyed enamel and hole in your tooth caused by the acid, that cavity can actually continue to spread into the deeper layers of your tooth. This is when you will feel pain or sensitivity. Reverse the damage Even though this process is happening when you eat sugar, there are other things going on in your mouth to fight against a cavity. Saliva is working hard to repair your teeth through a process called remineralization. The minerals in your saliva, calcium and phosphate, help to replace the minerals attacked by the acid. Fluoride in your water or in your toothpaste do the same thing to help your enamel. Other steps to take Besides cutting back on sugary foods and beverages, there are other steps you can take. If you’re eating sweets, try to do so during a meal. Avoid sticky foods because they will stick to your teeth and that gives them more time and opportunity to do damage. Sticky foods include starchy foods like crackers and chips. Drinking and rinsing with water can help. Choices like cheese or other dairy foods have calcium and phosphates. Those minerals help your enamel, like described above. Also, chewing sugarless gum or eating fresh fruits and vegetables, like celery, increases saliva production. And, of course, there is our ever constant reminder to brush twice a day for two minutes to prevent cavities. We care about the health of your smile and sugar is a big deterrence from keeping your smile cavity-free. Remember what’s going on in your mouth when you chew on that candy bar!

Oral Health Reads for Your Bookworm

by MikeMeehan 8/8/2017 12:51 PM

It’s back-to-school time for the kids, and now that we’ve covered tooth care tips to keep their smiles bright, let’s back up those healthy habits with some good reading material. Besides the importance of reading and encouraging it for our back-to-school theme, books about oral health can work as a way to get your kids excited about taking care of their teeth. With some assistance from you, what they read can inspire them to be more independent when taking care of their teeth. Using books as a tool to teach dental health can be fun and helpful. Books can also work as a buffer for push-back from kids who don’t want to brush and floss. Books can also help calm fears if your child is apprehensive about a visit to the dentist. Add to your children’s library We’ve put together a list to add to your children’s bookcase: Brush, Brush, Brush by Alicia Padron, for children ages 1-3, may be helpful if your child is scared or fussy when the little toothbrush comes out. Because it’s a board book, it’s easy for little hands to grip. Cheerful pictures demonstrate each step of brushing, like putting toothpaste on the brush and rinsing with water. The Tooth Book by Dr. Seuss, for children ages 2-5, might be the most recognizable book about teeth because it’s from one of the most adored children’s authors. It’s another good introduction to dental hygiene for the little ones. The book illustrates who has teeth and who doesn’t, and how to take care of your teeth. Going to the Dentist by Anne Civardi, for children ages 3-5, will teach your kids what to expect when they visit the dentist. This could help with any fear or anxiety. The book explains the different tools the dentist will use during the visit with an amusing and friendly tone. If you need a few more with this subject matter, there are similar ones from character favorites like Curious George and the Berenstain Bears. Famous author Mercer Mayor also has a book about visiting the dentist. Brush, Floss, and Rinse by Amanda Doering Tourville is for children ages 5-8. The book teaches readers about the importance of brushing and flossing. It describes how brushing keeps plaque and cavities away and explains how flossing keeps gums healthy. Other details in the book include when to get a new toothbrush and wearing a mouth guard for sports to protect teeth. For kids who don’t want to brush Here’s more titles to help if your kids are not cooperating when it’s time to brush their teeth: Pony Brushes His Teeth by Michael Dahl (ages 2-4) Ethan in the Kingdom of the Toothbrushes by Yael Manor (ages 2-4) Brush Your Teeth, Please by Leslie Mcguire (ages 2-5) For the first dentist visit These additional titles are helpful if your child is nervous about their first dentist appointment. Maisy, Charley, and the Wobbly Tooth by Lucy Cousins (ages 2-5) Dentist Trip from the Peppa Pig series (ages 2-5) All these books will coincide with your kids’ upcoming back-to-school dental and vision appointments and provide preparation for the school year. There are lots more titles to choose from, so spend a little time at the bookstore and find the ones that best suit you and your kids. And if you’d like to complement your child’s reading with some educational videos, visit our Land of Smiles website, and click on Curriculum Videos.  

3 Ways to Declare War on Cavities

by Jason 9/3/2015 7:00 AM

Cavities.

Your mouth’s worst enemy. It’s the last word you want to hear when you go to the dentist. Not only can cavities lead to more serious oral ailments, but treatment for cavities can also be costly.

92% of all adults have at least one cavity by the age of 64. But just because cavities are common doesn’t mean they can’t be prevented.
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