What’s the Difference Between Copay and Coinsurance?

by MikeMeehan 3/21/2018 1:39 PM

Copayment and coinsurance are both ways you help share the costs of dental care with Delta Dental. Most of the time, Delta Dental members have a copay or coinsurance, but not both. Here’s what you need to know: Copayment, also known as a copay, is a set amount you are required to pay your dentist for a service. When you have a copayment, you may not have to worry about a deductible or an annual maximum. A deductible is the set dollar amount you have to pay before your dental plan kicks in for covered services. Deductible amounts vary from plan to plan. An annual maximum is the most a dental plan will pay toward your dental care within a specific period, typically a calendar year. Coinsurance is a fixed percentage of a treatment cost you share with your dental plan. For example, you may be responsible for 20 percent of a given service while Delta Dental covers the other 80 percent. Meaning that if your total bill is $100 for a given service, you’ll pay $20 and Delta Dental will pay $80. However, you must first meet your deductible and you may have an annual maximum for the year. To learn more about your dental plan’s copay or coinsurance, login at deltadental.com or on Delta Dental’s free mobile app. You can also call the customer service number on your Delta Dental ID card.

A Rainbow of Foods to Keep Your Smile Healthy

by MikeMeehan 3/14/2018 9:52 AM

  You may not discover a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow this St. Patrick’s Day, but there are other ways rainbows can make you smile this month. These colorful fruits and veggies are full of flavor and will help keep your smile sparkling. Red: - Strawberries are a great source of vitamin C, which helps maintain gum health. - Red peppers also contain vitamin C, and they come with a host of anti-inflammatory benefits. Orange: - Pumpkin and carrots have lots of vitamin A, which helps keep mucous membranes healthy and prevent dry mouth. Carrots also contain immunity-strengthening antioxidants. - Butternut squash is rich with vitamin C and potassium that helps neutralize acids that remove calcium from the body. Yellow: - Yellow peppers have anti-inflammatory benefits and vitamin C. - Cheeses contain calcium that helps build strong bones and teeth.  Green: - Leafy greens contain vitamin K that helps block substances that break down bone, promoting good bone density. They are also a good source of calcium. - Broccoli contains folic acid that helps keep your gums healthy and can help prevent cleft lip and palate during pregnancy. Blue: - Blueberries are a rich source of vitamin C and vitamin K. Purple: - Eggplant contains vitamin C, vitamin K and potassium. It also has folic acid that builds strong bones and helps prevent osteoporosis. - Acai berries have antioxidants to strengthen immunity. White: - Cauliflower has vitamin C and antioxidants. It’s also an anti-inflammatory and a great substitute for starchy grains in diets. - Plain yogurt promotes strong teeth and bones by being rich in calcium.

The Effects of Alcohol on Your Teeth

by MikeMeehan 3/7/2018 9:25 AM

It’s common to indulge in a libation or two to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day – but will your smile feel the effects the next day? Here are a few ways to combat potential dental health issues while raising your glass to the Irish. Stay hydrated. Drinks containing spirits are especially drying to the mouth. A lack of saliva means food particles and plaque can stick to teeth longer than usual, potentially resulting in more cavities. Anytime you imbibe, especially liquor, offset the drying effects by drinking water throughout the evening. Skip the “twist.” Many martinis come with a garnish or a squirt of lemon or lime to bring out the flavors of the drink. Even a “squeeze” of lemon contains enough acid to harm tooth enamel, according to the American Dental Association, so it may be best to try a drink with a different garnish (olives are good!). Don’t go to the dark side. Red wine – and green beer – can stain teeth. If you have a drink that’s dyed or naturally dark, be sure to swish with water afterward. Though you may feel the urge to brush, it’s best not to do so immediately afterward: Acidic drinks can make tooth enamel soft, so brushing after enjoying a drink will likely do more harm than good. The bottom line: One night of celebrating probably isn’t going to cause tooth decay or damage. Just make sure it doesn’t become a habit, and remember to maintain good dental health habits like regular brushing and flossing.   1 https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/what-does-alcohol-do-to-your-teeth

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