At Work? Think About Your Eyes

by MikeMeehan 3/28/2018 2:34 PM

Eye injuries at work are very common, according to the American Optometric Association. But most of these injuries can be prevented with the proper eye protection and with raised awareness. Depending on your occupation, there are workplace eye safety precautions to take. Eye injuries at the workplace happen for two main reasons – you were not wearing any eye protection or you were wearing the wrong type of eye protection for the job at hand. Consider these potential hazards at your workplace: Projectiles or particles like bits of wood and metal that could fall or fly into your eye Chemicals that could splash into your eyes or create fumes Radiation exposure like UV, infrared and lasers Oil or grease that could splash into your eyes Bloodborne pathogens Then take these steps to prevent an eye injury: Assess your workplace and look for possible eye safety hazards If possible, remove or reduce the eye hazard Wear appropriate eye safety gear like safety glasses, goggles and face shields Regularly inspect your eye safety gear to be sure it’s still effective and not damaged Blue light at work Another eye hazard at work is blue light from your computer screen. If you have prolonged exposure to digital devices, you could be susceptible to Digital Eye Strain or Computer Vision Syndrome. If you spend more than two hours a day in front of the computer, you have a 90% chance of developing this vision problem. To prevent digital eye strain at work, use the 20-20-20 rule; every 20 minutes, take a 20-second break and focus on something at least 20 feet away. For Workplace Eye Wellness Month, Prevent Blindness America reminds all employees to have regular comprehensive eye exams to be sure they have sufficient vision in order to do their jobs safely.

What’s the Difference Between Copay and Coinsurance?

by MikeMeehan 3/21/2018 1:39 PM

Copayment and coinsurance are both ways you help share the costs of dental care with Delta Dental. Most of the time, Delta Dental members have a copay or coinsurance, but not both. Here’s what you need to know: Copayment, also known as a copay, is a set amount you are required to pay your dentist for a service. When you have a copayment, you may not have to worry about a deductible or an annual maximum. A deductible is the set dollar amount you have to pay before your dental plan kicks in for covered services. Deductible amounts vary from plan to plan. An annual maximum is the most a dental plan will pay toward your dental care within a specific period, typically a calendar year. Coinsurance is a fixed percentage of a treatment cost you share with your dental plan. For example, you may be responsible for 20 percent of a given service while Delta Dental covers the other 80 percent. Meaning that if your total bill is $100 for a given service, you’ll pay $20 and Delta Dental will pay $80. However, you must first meet your deductible and you may have an annual maximum for the year. To learn more about your dental plan’s copay or coinsurance, login at deltadental.com or on Delta Dental’s free mobile app. You can also call the customer service number on your Delta Dental ID card.

A Rainbow of Foods to Keep Your Smile Healthy

by MikeMeehan 3/14/2018 9:52 AM

  You may not discover a pot of gold at the end of a rainbow this St. Patrick’s Day, but there are other ways rainbows can make you smile this month. These colorful fruits and veggies are full of flavor and will help keep your smile sparkling. Red: - Strawberries are a great source of vitamin C, which helps maintain gum health. - Red peppers also contain vitamin C, and they come with a host of anti-inflammatory benefits. Orange: - Pumpkin and carrots have lots of vitamin A, which helps keep mucous membranes healthy and prevent dry mouth. Carrots also contain immunity-strengthening antioxidants. - Butternut squash is rich with vitamin C and potassium that helps neutralize acids that remove calcium from the body. Yellow: - Yellow peppers have anti-inflammatory benefits and vitamin C. - Cheeses contain calcium that helps build strong bones and teeth.  Green: - Leafy greens contain vitamin K that helps block substances that break down bone, promoting good bone density. They are also a good source of calcium. - Broccoli contains folic acid that helps keep your gums healthy and can help prevent cleft lip and palate during pregnancy. Blue: - Blueberries are a rich source of vitamin C and vitamin K. Purple: - Eggplant contains vitamin C, vitamin K and potassium. It also has folic acid that builds strong bones and helps prevent osteoporosis. - Acai berries have antioxidants to strengthen immunity. White: - Cauliflower has vitamin C and antioxidants. It’s also an anti-inflammatory and a great substitute for starchy grains in diets. - Plain yogurt promotes strong teeth and bones by being rich in calcium.

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