The difference between an ophthalmologist, an optometrist and an optician

by MikeMeehan 7/25/2018 1:16 PM

If you know the difference between the three vision care professionals, it will help when you go to your next comprehensive eye exam. Ophthalmologists, optometrists and opticians all provide eye care services, but the levels of training and expertise are different. An eye doctor, either an ophthalmologist or an optometrist, will oversee your eye exam, and an optician will likely be the specialist who will fit and dispense your corrective lens. Here’s some more information on each eye care professional: Ophthalmologist Ophthalmologists specialize in medical and surgical conditions of the eye. They will perform eye surgery and treat eye diseases. An ophthalmologist could be a doctor of medicine or a doctor of osteopathic medicine. They usually work in a medical office and may be affiliated with a hospital. Their education includes an undergraduate degree, medical school and four years of medical residency. They are also board certified. Optometrist An optometrist is a doctor of optometry. Typically, optometrists complete four years of undergraduate work and a four-year postgraduate degree program, which includes medical training. An optometrist’s work includes the diagnosis and management of eye diseases, and optometrists may treat eye diseases with medications.  Optician An optician fits and dispenses corrective lenses like eyeglasses and contact lenses. Optician educational training can vary but may include certificate programs or associate degree programs. Licensing depends on the state laws.  Check to see if your eye doctor is in the DeltaVision network or find a vision care professional in the DeltaVision network.

How to reduce your risk of eye injury

by MikeMeehan 7/11/2018 11:28 AM

Keeping your eyes safe from hazards only requires a few steps. Whether going for a swim or doing chores around the house, remember to keep your eyes protected. You will reduce your risk of eye injury by 90 percent if you wear protective eyewear. Protect your eyes You may already be required to wear safety protection at work, like safety glasses or face shields, but remember when you’re working at home, you need that protection, too. Some house chores that could be hazardous to your eyes include home repairs, yard work and cleaning with chemicals.  Home repairs. If you’re using a power tool, were eye protection. Using a hammer and nails or other tools can create an environment where those items can become projectiles. Yard work. Lawn mowers, trimmers and blowers can propel debris or other materials into your eyes. Safety glasses can also provide protection from branches and twigs that can be hazardous. Cleaning with chemicals. According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, chemicals in cleaning products, like bleach, cause 125,000 eye injuries a year. At work, or when working at home, consider safety glasses with side shields, face shields, goggles with ventilation, and other variations when deciding what gear best fits with your task. The fit of your protective eyewear is important for its effectiveness.  If you already wear glasses, those glasses aren’t enough to protect you. When choosing protective eyewear, look for the appropriate kind for your activity.  Are you protecting your eyes when you play sports? For sports, the National Eye Institute created a chart to find the right eye protection for a list of sports. There are many varieties of sports goggles, all specially designed for certain sports. And not only will the sports eyewear protect, they can advance and improve the performance of the athlete.  Basketball, baseball and racquet sports can have the most potential for eye injury. According to an article on AllAboutVision.com, the amount of sports-related eye injuries reported in emergency rooms are over 40,000 every year. But most of these injuries are preventable with protective eyewear. With sports, we may think of flying objects as the hazard, but eye injuries can be a result of an elbow or finger in a close contact sport.  Too much chlorine could hurt your eyes This summer, if you and your family are spending time at the pool, think about your eyes. The chlorine in the pool is protecting us from bacteria, but pools with too much chlorine can cause damage to the surface of your eyes. Chlorine can cause eyes to become red and itchy because it washes away the tear film on the surface of eyes. Tear film is the thin layer that keeps your eyes moist and smooth. Wearing swim goggles might be the best way to protect your eyes and your kids’ eyes. Washing your face and eyes with fresh water after a swim and using eye drops are some other things you can do combat the effects of chlorine on eyes. 

5 steps to healthy vision

by MikeMeehan 5/30/2018 9:27 AM

Sight could be one of the five senses that we take for granted the most. The National Eye Institute (NIH) says more than 23 million Americans (age 18 and older) have never had an eye exam. That is why Healthy Vision Month is important. Started in 2003, the NIH promotes Healthy Vision Month to encourage us to make eye health a priority. The NIH made it easy for you to recognize the occasion with five steps to keep your eyes healthy. Check these off your list and keep them in mind not just this month, but all year. Get a comprehensive dilated eye exam–Schedule a comprehensive dilated eye exam with your vision care provider. Some common eye diseases do not have early symptoms, but a comprehensive dilated eye exam can detect these diseases in the early stages. Use protective eyewear–Make sure you and your family are using protective eyewear during sports and other recreational activities. A good reminder now that the summer months are here. Also, when you are taking care of chores around the house or if you have a job that could pose a risk to your eyes, safety glasses can prevent injury. Know your family eye health history–Do some research and check in with your family members (parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles). Knowing if your family has vision problems or diseases will help determine if you are at high risk. Wear sunglasses–When you purchase sunglasses, pick a pair that blocks out 99-100% of UVA/UVB rays. The sun can have negative effects on your eyes. For example, extended UV exposure can cause cataracts. Live a healthy lifestyle–Your overall health affects the health of your eyes. More specifically, maintaining a healthy weight can reduce your risk of diabetes, which can lead to diabetic eye disease and vision loss. Other recommendations–consume healthy foods, refrain from smoking, and manage any chronic health conditions. All of these can be linked to your vision health. Now, participate even more with Healthy Vision Month–share this information with your family and friends. We’re happy you’re not taking your eyesight for granted.  

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