National Fresh Breath Day: Tips to Freshen Your Breath

by MikeMeehan 8/4/2016 4:31 PM

That clean, fresh feeling your mouth has after you brush your teeth in the morning helps get your day started and can give you a boost of confidence. But as the day wears on, your breath may take a nose dive. To mark National Fresh Breath Day, we’ve identified some potential causes of bad breath and ways that you can maintain clean, fresh breath. Bad breath can be caused by: Foods: Eating garlic, onions and spicy dishes can not only lead to strong odors lingering in your mouth, but after these foods are digested, their chemicals travel through the bloodstream to the lungs where you breathe them out. Poor oral hygiene: Not brushing and flossing enough can lead to plaque and bacteria build up in your mouth resulting in cavities, gum disease and infections. Dry mouth: Saliva helps clean your mouth naturally. When your mouth is dry and not producing enough saliva, food particles and bacteria remain in your mouth causing bad breath. Health issues: Diseases such as diabetes, bronchitis, acid reflex, ulcers, cancers and kidney or liver disease can give off strong odors that can be detected in the mouth. Tobacco: Smoking and chewing tobacco cause their own unpleasant odors. Using tobacco can also lead to gum disease, which is another source of bad breath.         You can freshen your breath by: Brushing your teeth and tongue at least twice a day and flossing at least once per day. Using a tongue scraper also helps remove bacteria from your tongue. Drinking lots of water to rinse and clean your mouth of bacteria. Avoiding sweets. Bacteria feed on sugar making bad breath worse. Chewing sugarless gum to produce saliva, which cleans your mouth. Not using tobacco. If these tips don’t help eliminate bad breath, consult your dentist or doctor. Your bad breath may be a symptom of a larger medical issue.

Six ways to reduce the effects of sport drinks on your teeth

by MikeMeehan 7/22/2016 4:33 PM

Summer is here and that means getting more outdoor exercise like walking, hiking and biking. To quench their thirst, many people turn to sports drinks, but may be unaware of the harm that these beverages can have on teeth. The acid levels of sports drinks can cause damage to teeth by softening tooth enamel and exposing the softer material underneath. When tooth enamel becomes damaged, teeth become more sensitive to hot and cold temperatures, and more vulnerable to cavities and tooth decay. Since tooth enamel can’t be regrown, its loss is irreversible. Sports drinks may be needed to replace electrolytes after long, high intensity workouts, but for light to moderate exercise, water is still the best drink for rehydrating. If you do reach for a sports drink, follow these tips to minimize the effects on your teeth: Dilute with water to reduce concentrated sugar levels Drink out of a straw to minimize contact with teeth Drink in moderation Chew sugar-free gum after drinking to increase saliva flow, which helps return acid levels to normal levels Rinse your mouth with water to keep excess drink from collecting on teeth Wait 30-60 minutes before brushing, since the toothbrush could spread acid around the mouth and cause further damage to teeth These tips will help keep your oral health in shape as you work towards improving your overall physical health through exercise.

Mouth-Healthy Moms-to-Be

by Noelle Reinhold 1/19/2016 9:28 AM

You’re taking your prenatal vitamins, getting in your weekly read of What to Expect When You’re Expecting, exercising, eating healthy, making regular visits to the obstetrician and day-dreaming about meeting your sweet new baby. But, have you been to the dentist?... more...

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