Men Need to Visit the Dentist More, Survey Finds

by MikeMeehan 6/14/2017 9:42 AM

Statistics show men need to visit the dentist more. There are some strong indicators that show we need to encourage our fathers, sons, brothers, husbands, and friends to take better care of their oral health. Recent noteworthy stats June is Men’s Health Month, and oral health is an important part of overall health. According to the 2017 Delta Dental Adult Oral Health and Well-Being Survey, men need to focus more on their oral health. Here are some of statistics from the recent survey: Only 63% of men visit the dentist at least once a year Only 69% of men brush their teeth the recommended twice a day 59% of men skip a brushing session at least once a month In the same survey, 69% of respondents noted that a smile is most important for a first impression whether at work, on a date, or other circumstances. It seems we all value a bright smile, and it’s a good reason to keep your oral health a priority. Periodontal disease, a specific concern Other studies have shown that men are more likely than women to develop periodontal (gum) disease. For example, 56.4% of men develop gum disease compared to 38.4% of women. Periodontal disease has been linked to cardiovascular disease and other health factors, so this is another alert to men. Watch for signs of gum disease such as swollen, red, tender or bleeding gums. There is another specific concern for men if they’re taking heart or blood pressure medication. These medications can cause a condition called dry mouth. With a lack of saliva, the risk of cavities increases. Some recommendations to combat dry mouth are increasing water intake, and avoiding salty foods, alcohol, caffeine and carbonated drinks. Some standard tips for oral health The choices and habits of some men can put them at a greater risk of oral health problems. Here are some standard dental health tips as a reminder, not just for men, for everyone: Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day – It’s essential to prevent gum disease, tooth decay and bad breath. Visit the dentist – During your visit, get screened for gum disease and oral cancer. Choose healthier foods – Choosing fruits and veggies instead of pretzels and chips will not only help your overall health, it will prevent cavities from those foods that are high in carbs and sugar. Don’t use your teeth as a tool – This is often the reason behind dental injuries. Use your hand and arm strength to open those bottles and bags. No more tobacco – Smoking and chewing tobacco can cause oral cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, oral cancers are more than twice as common in men as in women. Gum disease, lost teeth, stained teeth and bad breath are some other possible impacts of using tobacco and tobacco products. Use these examples when you encourage a person (like your dad) to quit. On Father’s Day this Sunday, check in with your dad and make sure he is visiting the dentist. A new electronic toothbrush with a supply of dental floss would be a useful and considerate gift. Most importantly, tell him you care about him. That alone could be enough motivation for him to visit the dentist and pay more attention to his oral health.

#ikickbutts — Stand Against the Harmful Effects of Smoking on Teeth and Eyes

by MikeMeehan 3/15/2017 11:02 AM

Set cups in a schoolyard fence. Host an online training course. Chalk statistics onto a sidewalk. These are some of the activities suggested for National Kick Butts Day. The day seeks to empower youth to stand against tobacco use by participating in activism at their high school or college. In addition to the activism of this day, we’d like to draw attention to what might not be as common knowledge: the harmful effects tobacco and smoking have on the mouth and eyes. 7 Ways Tobacco Products Can Hurt the Mouth Tobacco products can hurt your mouth in a handful of ways. They can lead to: Bad breath. Nicotine inhibits the body’s ability to produce saliva, and a dry mouth can cause bad breath. Yellowed teeth. The two main culprits that yellow teeth in tobacco products are nicotine and tar. Even though nicotine is colorless, it turns yellow when exposed to oxygen. Gum disease. Nicotine deprives the gums of nutrients and oxygen, which can cause gums to recede. In some cases, tobacco users also experience bleeding or swollen gums. But that’s not it. According to the American Dental Association, the impact of tobacco products on your mouth also includes: Stained tongue Dulled sense of taste and smell Slow healing after a tooth extraction or other surgery Difficulties in correcting cosmetic dental problems Tobacco products can also lead to oral cancer. Why Oral Cancer Screening Is Important The Delta Dental Plans Association has released studies showing smokers are six times as likely to develop oral cancer as nonsmokers. Delta Dental follows the recommendations of The American Cancer Society — that your dentist or primary care doctor check your mouth and throat for oral cancer as part of a routine checkup. The process for screening is simple. Your dentist looks in your mouth for early signs of cancer. Tell your dentist about any swelling, sores, or discoloring around your mouth, lips, or throat. Screening is important for the following reasons: Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral cancer in 2017, according to The Oral Cancer Foundation. According to the foundation, oral cancer will cause close to 10,000 deaths in the U.S. On average, only 60 percent of those with the disease will live more than five years after being diagnosed, according to the Delta Dental Plans Association. By quitting tobacco use, smokers can cut their risk in half in just five years. After 10 years, former smokers have the same risk as people who never used tobacco. 6 Ways Tobacco Products Can Harm the Eyes Not only do tobacco products affect teeth, they can affect eyesight. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, two of the greatest threats are cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Cataracts. Cataracts are a clouding of the eye’s lens, which affects your ability to focus. According to the New York State Department of Health, heavy smokers (15 cigarettes a day or more) have up to three times the risk of cataract as nonsmokers. Age-related macular degeneration (or AMD). AMD causes loss in the center of field of vision. Smokers are three to four times more likely to develop AMD than nonsmokers, according to the New York State Department of Health. Smoking also increases the risk for: Glaucoma Diabetic retinopathy Uveitis (an inflammation of the part of the eye called the uvea) Dry eye syndrome (a condition in which a person either doesn’t produce enough tears or produces tears that evaporate too quickly) Never Too Late to Quit Nobody wants a discolored smile or to see the world through blurry lenses. If you are using tobacco, it’s not too late to quit today. By quitting, you can prevent gum disease and/or improve the condition of your gums, as well as lower your chances of eye disease. Tomorrow is National Kick Butts Day. Many high schools, college campuses and other organizations around the nation will participate. You can participate by using the hashtag #ikickbutts.  

A Parent’s Plan to the Perfect Pajama Party: 3 DIYs To Get The Party Started

by Noelle Reinhold 12/10/2015 8:00 AM

So, you’ve decided to be brave and host your child’s slumber party. Good for you, gallant guardian! Like adults, it’s important for little ones to have “goof around time” where they can unwind, unplug and socialize (i.e. your Tuesday taco night with the ladies).... more...

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